1 in 4 girls will be sexual molested by 18th birthday.

1 in 6 boys will be sexual molested by 18th birthday.

Well over 42 million adults in the United States were sexually molested as children.

88% of all abuse is never reported.

Nearly 70% of all reported sexual assaults (including assaults on adults) occur to children ages 17 and under (Snyder, 2000).
Youths have higher rates of sexual assault victimization than adults. In 2000, the sexual assault victimization rate for youths 12 to 17 was 2.3 times higher than for adults (U.S. Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2000).

93% of juvenile sexual abuse victims know their attacker.

Someone in the US is sexually assaulted every 2 minutes.

Children of every gender, age, race, ethnicity, background, socioeconomic status and family structure are at risk. No child is immune.

Victims of sexual assault are 26 times more likely to abuse drugs. And 13 times more likely to abuse alcohol.

Child sexual abuse plays an important role in the cost of mental health services.  Our counry spends between $70 – $120 BILLION a year on the after effects of child abuse.

Up to 50% of those who sexually abuse children are under the age of 18

Nearly 70% of all reported sexual assaults (including assaults on adults) occur to children ages 17 and under (Snyder, 2000).

Youths have higher rates of sexual assault victimization than adults. In 2000, the sexual assault victimization rate for youths 12 to 17 was 2.3 times higher than for adults (U.S. Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2000)

Children are most vulnerable to sexual abuse between the ages of 7 and 13. (Finkelhor, 1994)

Child abusers often do not use physical force but instead “groom” or use manipulative tactics, such as buying gifts, arranging special activities, exposing children to pornography, and roughhousing to keep a child engaged with and often confused about the abuser’s motives

Children may not reveal sexual abuse because they feel shame or guilt, they worry no one will believe them, they fear being removed from their home, and they or their family may have been threatened. Very young children may not have the language skills to report the abuse or may not understand they are being abused

Child sexual abuse affects people in all walks of life.

Vulnerable children, such as those with learning disabilities or who are isolated can be even more vulnerable to sexual abuse.

Children find it extremely hard to speak out if they are being or have been abused. In 2000 a study was conducted by the NSPCC and below are some of the reasons why children were unable to tell:  1.  it was nobody else’s business, didn’t think it was serious or wrong, didn’t want parents to find out, didn’t want friends to find out, didn’t want the authorities to find out, was frightened, didn’t think would be believed, had been threatened by abuser.

Children living without either parent (foster children) are 10 times more likely to be sexually abused than children that live with both biological parents. Children who live with a single parent that has a live-in partner are at the highest risk: they are 20 times more likely to be victims of child sexual abuse than children living with both biological parents (Sedlack, et. al., 2010).

Sexually abused children may also develop the following:  1.  unusual interest in or avoidance of all things of a sexual nature, 2.  sleep problems or nightmares, 3. depression or withdrawal from friends or family, 4. seductiveness, 5. statements that their bodies are dirty or damaged, or fear that there is something wrong with them in the genital area, 6. refusal to go to school, 7. delinquency/conduct problems, 8. secretiveness, 9. aspects of sexual molestation in drawings, games, fantasies, 10. unusual aggressiveness, or 11. suicidal behavior.